Laura's Lineal and Collateral Ascent



Notes


Matches 151 to 200 of 436

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151 Ella May Tyson in marriage record online Tyson, Mary Ella (I1167)
 
152 email from Uncle Ozzie:
I know you did some genealogical work on the family in the past. Did you do the Wright Family? That would have been your great aunt Muriel’s family. If so did you happen to get addresses for any of them? 
Garrett, Muriel Lee (I302)
 
153 Enrollment Cards for the Five Civilized Tribes, 1898-1914; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1186, 93 rolls); Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Record Group 75; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Source (S821)
 
154 Estella M. Kalb: Newspaper Obituary and Death Notice
Sun, The (Baltimore, MD) - June 2, 1995
Deceased Name: Estella M. Kalb
Woodlawn farmer Estella M. Reich Kalb, who farmed for 55 years with her husband in Woodlawn, died Sunday at home of cardiac arrest. She was 91.

She and her husband, Edgar A. Kalb, began working Rolling Road Farm, a 40-acre dairy and poultry farm, after their marriage in 1930. The farm had been in Mr. Kalb's family for more than 200 years.

The couple eventually expanded the farm to 130 acres, and operated a retail route that delivered produce, butter, cottage cheese and turkeys at holiday time to customers in Catonsville and West Baltimore.

Known as Honey, she was born and raised in Catonsville and was a 1922 graduate of Catonsville High School.

She was a member of the historic Old Salem Lutheran Church and the Emmarts United Methodist Church. Services were held yesterday.

She is survived by her husband; a son, David R. Kalb of Bozman; a sister, Charlotte M. Whitehead of Ann Arbor, Mich.; three grandsons; and two great-grandchildren.

Memorial donations may be made to Emmarts United Methodist Church, 7100 Dogwood Road, Baltimore 21244; or Old Salem Lutheran Church, Catonsville 21228.

Edition: FINAL
Page: 5B
Copyright (c) 1995 The Baltimore Sun Company 
Reich, Estella M. (I1925)
 
155 Estimate of birthdate based on estimate of ages of sons James and John Doak, Robert (I3083)
 
156 estimating death to be between the conception of youngest child born in Missouri (1887) and the date of the 1900 census (12June1900) Salkowski, Andrew (I2895)
 
157 excerpt from THE POETS AND POETRY OF CECIL COUNTY, MARYLAND by George Johnston, p. 216

WILLIAM JAMES JONES.

William Janes Jones was born in Elkton, August 25, 1829, and received his education at the common school and Academy in that town. His youth and early manhood was spent in mechanical pursuits and in the improvement of his mind by a desultory course of reading, and in perfecting himself in the knowledge of the Latin language.

In 1852, Mr. Jones purchased a half interest in theCecil Whigand became the editor of that journal for a short time, and until its founder P. C. Ricketts, who was then editing theDaily News,of Baltimore, returned from that city and resumed the duties of editor of theWhig.

In 1853, Mr. Jones commenced the study of the law in the office of John C. Groome, Esq., in Elkton and was admitted to the Bar, September 21, 1855.

In politics Mr. Jones was a Whig, but allied himself with the American party when it was in course of formation and continued to be an active member as long as the party lasted. In 1857 he was appointed State's Attorney for Cecil county, to fill a vacancy, and in 1859 was elected to the same office for the term of four years. At the outbreak of the war of the rebellion Mr. Jones allied himself with the Union cause and was elected to the House of Delegates by the Union party in 1863, and was appointed two years afterwards, United States' District Attorney for the district of Maryland, and held the office for about a year, and until he was removed by President Andrew Johnson for opposing his policy of reconstruction. In 1858 he married Miss Mary Jane Smith, of Connecticut. They are the parents of one son and two daughters, the eldest of whom is the wife of Rev. Walter E. Avery, of the Wilmington Conference.

Mr. Jones is one of the most earnest and successful members of the Elkton Bar, and though not a voluminous writer, in early life contributed poetry to the columns of theCecil Whigof which the following poems are specimens. 
Jones, William James (I127)
 
158 excerpt from THE POETS AND POETRY OF CECIL COUNTY, MARYLAND by George Johnston, p. 243

FOLGER McKINSEY.

Folger McKinsey

was born in Elkton, on the 29th of Aug'ust, 1866, in the cottage on Bow street now occupied by Thomas W. Green. His early life was spent in Elkton, except a few years in childhood when his parents resided in the West and South, until 1879, when they removed to Philadelphia, taking their son with them. His paternal grandfather was a Scotchman, and his grand parents on his mother's side were Germans, from the country bordering on the Rhine. Through the marriage of his maternal great grandmother he is distantly related to Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe. Both his parents are persons of intellectual ability, and have written verse, his mother having been a contributor to the local newspapers of this county, and to several western journals.

Mr. McKinsey received his education at the primary school of Miss Tabitha Jones, on Main street, in Elkton, where he was sent when seven years of age. Except an attendance of eight months at the public school of Elkton, he never attended any other schools. In early childhood he showed a great desire to read, and is indebted to his relative, William J. Jones, and to L. Marshall Haines and E. E. Ewing for the means of gratifying his early thirst for information. Shortly after removing to Philadelphia Mr. McKinsey entered a mercantile establishment as clerk, but soon afterwards accepted a position in the office of a publishing house, and subsequently entered the office of the Philadelphia and Reading railroad company as clerk in the record department. While in the office of the railroad company he wrote and published his first poem. It is called "Satana Victo" and is written in blank verse. Since that time he has been a prolific writer of both poetry and prose, much of which has been published.

In October, 1884, Mr. McKinsey accepted the position of editor of theShore Gazette,a weekly journal published at Ocean Beach, N. J., which he continued to fill for some months, when he returned to Philadelphia and accepted a position as special writer on a prominent daily journal of that city. In October, 1885, Mr. McKinsey accepted the position of associate editor of theCecil Whig,which he continued to fill until the following March when he became editor of theDailyandWeekly News,of Frederick City, Maryland. During the time he was connected with theWhighe began the publication of a journal in Darby, called theDelaware County Independent. In January, 1886, Mr. McKinsey married Miss Fannie Holenrake Dungan, an estimable young English lady of Camden, N. J. Mr. McKinsey is a great admirer of Joaquin Miller and Walt Whitman, and a warm personal friend of the latter.

Though young in years he writes with as much fluency and ease as if he had been writing poetry for half an ordinary lifetime, and gives promise of a brilliant career that will be creditable to his native town, and beneficial to the human race.
 
McKinsey, Folger (I171)
 
159 family bible gives birthdate as 24March1853. Patterson, Lilla Belle (I2586)
 
160 Fanny and Mabel Doak, "nieces", are living with Ida and husband in 1880. I believe these are children of Jonathan and Rebecca Doak.

Waco, Texas City Directory 1902 - 1903
Starnes Ida (wid. S. S.), r. 502 N 10th 
Doak, Ida (I1274)
 
161 father is listed as a Lumberman on birth record for Wesley Naylor, Wesley James (I565)
 
162 Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Source (S789)
 
163 FindAGrave record gives death date ... unknown if date is on tombstone Source (S479)
 
164 First Census of the United States, 1790 (NARA microfilm publication M637, 12 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Source (S786)
 
165 Florence listed as having been married once before Family F335
 
166 Found a Rowland Brush in "Canada, Upper Canada Census, 1842," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KDRN-ZVX : accessed 22 Jun 2014), Rowland Brush, , , , Ontario, Canada; citing reference MG 31 C1; Library and Archives Canada microfilm reel C-1345, Public Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario; FHL microfilm 2443956.
Not sure who this is unless it is the father of Rowland Brush because there is only 1 male in the household and he is listed as being 60+ and single (widowed?).
Rowland Brush is listed directly beneath an Arthur Robinson (Isabella's last name is Robinson).

Age in 1851 Canada census is 32
Age on 2nd marriage record in Jan 1868 is 46
Age in June 1870 Alpena County, Michigan census is 50
 
Brush, Rowland (I567)
 
167 Found an Otto Ladtkow and family in New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957:
Arrival Date: 6 Jul 1901
Estimated birth year: abt 1863
Age: 38
Gender: Male
Port of Departure: Hamburg
Ethnicity/Race/Nationality: German
Ship Name: Phoenicia
Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Line: 5
Microfilm Serial: 15t715
Microfilm Roll: T715_210
Page Number: 124
Bertha age 29, wife
children:
Ida, 11
Martha, 9
Albert, 7
Mina, 4
Ludwig, 3
Peter, 10 months
and Wilhelmina, mother, 76

Destination: Milwaukee, Wisconsin where brother August Ladtkow lives 
Ladkau, Ottfried (I396)
 
168 Found this info on Gary Anderson's website:

Matthias (Imm) TYSON- 1758 Will
Source: Cornelius TYSON Descendents, by G. A. Kerr-Tyson

"I nominate my two sons, Cornelius and John TYSON to be my executors.

To Barbara Sellen TYSON, my beloved wife, all my household goods, one cow, the sum of Two Hundred Pounds, should any part remain after her decease and the funeral expenses are paid, said sum shall be divided into eight equal parts to be paid when they are twenty one or married which may happen first. The remaining estate equally among my eight children.

Cornelius, one eighth; Henry TYSON, one eighth in trust [Henry was blind], to be paid to the granddaughters, Sibilla and Barbara.

The third eighth to Margaret and her four sons she had by Jacobus PENNEBECKER, viz: Matthias, Henry, Barbara, and Jacobus.

The fourth eighth to be divided among children of Peter, viz: Mary, Barbara, Cornelius, Catharine, and Joseph.

The remaining four eighths to sons, William, John, Benjamin, and Joseph.

Ratifying and confirming this writing, contained in two pages and this part of the third page of this one sheet of midling, to be my last will and testament."

Witnesses:
John BOCKIUS
Joseph ASHMEAD
Thomas ROSE

Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania Wills, 1682-1819 (Ancestry.com)
Date: 2 Sep 1758
Prove Date: 26 Jul 1766
BookPage: N:530
Remarks: Mathias Tyson. Perquiomen. Co. of Phila. Yeoman. 2 Sep 1758. 26 July 1766. Wife: Barbara. Children: Cornelius, John, Henry, Margaret, William, Benjamin, Joseph. Grandchildren: Sebilla and Barbara Tyson, Mathias, Henery, Barbara and Jacobus Pennebecker, Mary, Barbara, Cornelius, Catherine and Joseph Tyson. Execs.: Cornelius and John Tyson. Codicil. 6 April 1766. Grandchild: Jacob Tyson. Witnesses to Codicil: Ezekeil Rhoades, Melchior Wagener. N:530.

From Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, Volumes I-III; Tyson Family:

Matthias Tyson, eldest son of Cornelius and Margaret, was born in Crefeld and accompanied his parents to Pennsylvania. He married Barbara Sellen, daughter of Hendrick Sellen, another native of Crefeld, and original settler of Germantown, and one of the first trustees of the First Mennonite church of Germantown. Some years after his arrival in Pennsylvania, he made a trip back to Crefeld, and returned to Pennsylvania, thus crossing the ocean three times. A paper dated 1706, containing his signature, is in possession of Hon. Samuel W. Pennypacker, who is a descendant, through Matthias Tyson's daughter Margaret, who married Jacob Pannebecker. Hendrick Sellen left four children, Jacob, a "shopkeeper" of Worcester township, who died without issue in 1759, leaving a legacy to the poor of the Mennonite congregation at "Perkyomie & Skepack;" John; Barbara, the wife of Matthias Tyson, and Elizabeth, the wife of Arnold Van Fossen.
 
Tyson, Matthias (I267)
 
169 Fourth Census of the United States, 1820. (NARA microfilm publication M33, 142 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. Source (S783)
 
170 from 1780-1783 Chester County Tax Index on http://www.chesco.org/
Lewis Catherine Upper Darby State (S-12b) pdf 73 1783

Lewis, Catherine Upper Darby F#:504 F:3/16/1810 P:10/1/1818
Spouse:Thomas Lewis
Children mentioned in will:
Thomas
Mordecai
Jane, married ___ Tyson
Sidney, married ___ Williamson
Demaris, married ___ Bittle
Sarah, married ___ Cochran
Elizabeth
The above contributed to pa-roots.org by Carol Eddleman.

Delaware Co Wills, 1789-1834

LEWIS, CATHARINE, Upper Darby.
March 15, 1810 - October 1, 1818.
My desire is that my husband Thomas LEWIS'S will shall stand good in
all its parts. Land to sons Thomas and Mordecai. Other children: Jane
TYSON, Sidney WILLIAMSON, Demaris BITTLE, Sarah COCHRAN and Elizabeth
LEWIS, also grandchildren Thomas TYSON and Thomas COCHRAN - mentions
children (not named) of Elizabeth and of Rachel MARLOW.
Exrs: Son Thomas and son in law John COCHRAN.
Wits: William JOHNSON and Margret HOOVER. #504.

John Kirk left 5 acres each to nephews Thomas and Mordecai Lewis, heir of Thomas Lewis.
 
Kirk, Catherine (I1088)
 
171 from 1897 Alpena City Directory:
Wikaryasz John, lab Huron H and L Co, res 703 Tawas.

John's death certificate lists Anthony Wikaryasz and Karoline as his parents 
Wikaryasz, John (I534)
 
172 from 1905 Alpena Directory:
Buelow Charles A (Charles A Buelow & Co), res 1312 Trowbridge rd.
BUELOW CHARLES A & CO (C Howard McKim, Frederick Polzin, Charles A Buelow), Groceries and Provisions, 129 S 2d av cor Lockwood, Tel Mutual.
Buelow Matilda (wid Fred'k), bds 1312 Trowbridge rd. 
Schultz, Matilda (I857)
 
173 from : England & Wales marriages 1837-2008
William Taylor possibly married Elizabeth _____:
Baker in 1839 (2nd Q); vol 11 p. 89
Bath in 1840 (1st Q); vol 11 p. 4
Galsworthy in 1840 (2nd Q); vol 11 p. 79 also in England Marriages 1538-1973: m. 21 Jun 1840 in Bedminster; William's father's name - John; spouse's father's name - Humphrey Galsworthy
Anderson in 1840 (2nd Q); vol 11 p. 79
Hutchings in 1840 (2nd Q); vol 11 p. 79
Fort in 1840 (2nd Q); vol 10 p. 607; District - Chard
Dimyock in 1840 (2nd Q); vol 10 p. 607; District - Chard
Eliza Selway in 1841 (2nd Q); vol 10, p. 695
Eliza Dawkins in 1841 (2nd Q); vol 10, p. 695
 
Taylor, William (I2983)
 
174 from Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York for the Year 1893. Volume II. Registers of the 1st, 2d, 3d and 4th Regiments of Cavalry, N. Y. Vols., in War of the Rebellion:

First New York Calvalry

CLARLY, DENNIS.--Age, 22 years. Enlisted February 26, 1864, at New York; mustered in as private, Company B, February 26, 1864, to serve three years; mustered out with company, June 27, 1865, at Alexandria, Va., as Cleary, Dennis.

from New York Tribune, Saturday July 22, 1899:
Dennis Cleary, of No. 606 Main St. has been taken to the insane asylum at Poughkeepsie. On Monday he attempted to assault W. F. Chambers in the latter's store, in Main St., with a butcher knife. Cleary was examined by Dr. P. W. O'Brien, the Health Officer, and Dr. C. C. Knight, and declared a lunatic. Cleary is a veteran, married, and has four children. 
Cleary, Dennis (I1229)
 
175 from Biographical and genealogical history of the state of Delaware, Volume 1 by Runk, J.M. & Co

His [George W. Moore's] grandfather, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage, was a soldier in the colonial army during the Revolutionary War, and his grandmother was so harassed by the British soldiers that she removed from her home in Delaware to a safer place across the state line in Pennsylvania. There James Moore, father of George W. Moore, was born. After peace was declared, Mrs. Moore returned to Delaware with her young son, and rejoined her husband.

--------------------------------------------------------------

I wonder if the Moore family originally lived in Pennsylvania and during the war, Mrs. Moore (George W. Moore's grandmother) "removed from her home" in Pennsylvania "to a safer place across the state line in" Delaware (instead of the opposite as from the Runk book).

The DAR applications with James Moore (Sr.) as the patriot, has him serving in the Chester County militia, 1st Battalion, 3rd Company, 7th Class (is this the "permanent billet roll" or the "active duty roll"; there is a difference).
That particular company in 1780 consisted of males from Uwchlan Township.

There is a James Moore in the Chester County, Pennsylvania census living in Uwchlan(d) Township with

George W. Moore's father, James Moore, is listed as being born in Delaware, NOT Pennsylvania, on both the 1850 and 1860 censuses. 
Moore, James (I1184)
 
176 from Biographical and genealogical history of the state of Delaware, Volume 1 by Runk, J.M. & Co:

George W. Moore, father of Mrs. Anna Tibbitt, was born in Mill Creek hundred, New Castle county, December 1, 1822. His grandfather, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage, was a soldier in the colonial army during the Revolutionary War, and his grandmother was so harassed by the British soldiers that she removed from her home in Delaware to a safer place across the state line in Pennsylvania. There James Moore, father of George W. Moore, was born. After peace was declared, Mrs. Moore returned to Delaware with her young son, and rejoined her husband. James Moore was a millwright until his marriage, when he turned his attention to farming, in which he was engaged in New Castle county, Del., and Cecil county, Md., until within a few years before his death, when he removed to Newark, Del., and made his home with his son, George W.
George W. Moore attended public schools in Mill Creek hundred, New Castle county, Del., and in Cecil county, Md. In the former county he learned shoemaking with his brother, William M., and carried on that trade in Mill Creek hundred, Christiana and Newark, until 1876. In that year he removed to Wilmington, where he worked as a shoemaker until 1890, and then retired. In his seventy-seventh year he is still robust in constitution and genial in disposition. He has always supported the Democratic party but has never held nor sought office. In Wilmington, in 1852, George W. Moore married Susan Ann, daughter of Tobias and Maria (Tyson) McKensey, born in Cecil county, Md., and of ScotchIrish descent. Their children are: I. James, of Wilmington, engaged in railroad service; II. Ella (Mrs. George W. Tyson), of Wilmington; III. Anna Belle (Mrs. James Tibbitt); IV. Lavinia Jane (Mrs. William Derrickson), of New Haven, Conn.; V. Charles, barber, of Wilmington; VI. George L., died young. Mr. and Mrs. Moore, with their family, attend the Presbyterian church.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Civil War Draft Registration has George W. Moore listed twice (on the same page) in White Clay Creek Hundred, New Castle County, Delaware as a Shoemaker, age 40. One of the listings has him as having paid commutation.

1883-1884 Wilmington, Delaware city directory has George W. Moore listed as a shoemaker living at 221 Jefferson with his son James T. Moore (morocco finisher).

Address at time of death: 103 S. DuPont St.

Fri, Feb 24, 2012 11:29 am email:
We are writing to let you know that a Find A Grave volunteer has reported a problem with your photo request for George Moore.

The general problem they reported is:
I searched the stated plot or section and could not find the grave

They also reported, specifically:
I have photographed the entire cemetery and posted all photos to site.

Moore - Lombardy Cem., Delaware
Hello - I have photographed the entire cemetery and did not see your requests. However, there are many unreadable stones. Please check Lombardy and look under Unknowns - maybe you can ascertain some info. I deleted your requests so as to save someone else time looking. Kimberly
Added by Kimberly on Feb 24, 2012 9:33 AM
 
Moore, George Washington (I38)
 
177 from Biographical and genealogical history of the state of Delaware, Volume 1 by Runk, J.M. & Co:

His [George W. Moore's] grandfather, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage, was a soldier in the colonial army during the Revolutionary War, and his grandmother was so harassed by the British soldiers that she removed from her home in Delaware to a safer place across the state line in Pennsylvania. There James Moore, father of George W. Moore, was born. After peace was declared, Mrs. Moore returned to Delaware with her young son, and rejoined her husband. James Moore was a millwright until his marriage, when he turned his attention to farming, in which he was engaged in New Castle county, Del., and Cecil county, Md., until within a few years before his death, when he removed to Newark, Del., and made his home with his son, George W. Mr. Moore enlisted in a volunteer company of infantry during the War of 1812, and was assigned to guard duty at New Castle, Del. He was a Republican, and afterward a Democrat, in his political views. James Moore married Martha Kennett, born in York County, Pa., a daughter of a soldier of the Revolution. They had children: I. Jane (Mrs. James R. Reynolds), died in Cecil county, Md.; II. Ann (Mrs. Washington Woodward), deceased; III. Eliza (Mrs. E. Lamborn), of Lancaster, Pa.; IV. John, deceased; V. Robert, deceased; VI. William M., deceased; VII. Sarah (Mrs. William W. Bowers), of Wilmington, widow; VIII. George W.; IX. James T., of Cumberland, Md. Mr. Moore died in Newark; his widow died in Cecil county, Md.; both were buried in Sharp's gravevard in Cecil county, Md.

-------------------------------------------------

Martha Moore is buried at Sharp's Graveyard in Cecil County, Maryland at Fair Hill, died January 5th, 1853, 69 yrs. 
Kennett, Martha (I447)
 
178 from Catholic Church Records, Alpena, MI (1864 - 1925) on http://www.alpenalibrary.org :
Mary Helen Lacomb, parents not known; adopted by Francis Lacomb, was baptized St Bernard, Alpena 1 Nov 1888 and born 15 Mar 1887. Godparents were Oliver Potvin and Elizabeth Potvin. Church Records [I wonder why Norah Lacomb is not listed as an adoptive parent]

The same day, the following baptism took place:
Thomas Bernard Potvin, son of Oliver Potvin and Mary Ann Butler, was baptized St Bernard, Alpena 1 Nov 1888
and born 4 Oct 1888. Godparents were Francis Lacomb and Mrs. Butler. Church Records
 
Lacomb, MaryEllen (I544)
 
179 from Catholic Church Records, Alpena, MI (1864 - 1925):
John Lecomb of Alpena, son of F. LaComb and Honora McCarty, married St Bernard, Alpena 12 Nov 1903
Henrietta Rabiteau of Bell, Presque Isle, daughter of Nelson Rabiteau. Witnesses were Francis Gibbons and
Edward Canfield. Church records p. 90 
Lacomb, John (I543)
 
180 From Chester Co., PA Marriage Records:
Married July 29,1802, by Rev. William Rogers. Both of Upper Darby. 
Tyson, Jacob (I133)
 
181 from Doak Family History and Genealogy by B. E. Hanes:
John M. Doak, of Del Rio, Texas writes: "My father was Jonathan A. Doak. He came to Texas from Mississippi about 1849. I know very little about his people, but he told me that he was Irish. I heard him speak of two brothers, Boyd and John. John came to Texas." 
Doak, John M. (I2860)
 
182 from FindMyPast.com - Carmarthen Baptisms
First name(s) ALICE ANNE
Last name EDMUNDS
Birth year 1871
Birth day -
Birth month -
Baptism year 1871
Baptism day 10
Baptism month Sep
Baptism place LLANSTEPHAN
Father's first name(s) Edmund
Mother's first name(s) Esther
County Carmarthenshire
Country Wales
Record set Carmarthen Baptisms 
Edmunds, Alice Ann (I1973)
 
183 from GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS FROM THE DEED BOOKS 1 THROUGH 9,1822-1845, MADISON COUNTY, TENNESSEE
By Jonathan K. T. Smith
Copyright, Jonathan K. T. Smith, 1995:PATSEY DOAK, exec of Robert Doak, dec, of Madison Co., Tenn. sold to WILLIAM H. DOAK, for $250, 50 acres "on the waters of the south fork of forked deer river," on McNairy & Butler's east boundary line. SD 10, R 1, Sec 9. Feb. 8, 1822. Rec March 1822. No wits. 
_____, Martha Patsey (I2062)
 
184 from http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/DOVER/1999-07/0931135142

From:
Subject: [DOVER-L] DOVER & DURHAM
Date: Sun, 4 Jul 1999 20:39:02 EDT

John Perry Phillips appears to be the son of Joseph Phillips born 1811 Union
County, SC (wife Nancy BYRD) which is tucked in between York and Spartanburg.
John first married Frances WARD in 1861 and had several children. When he
married Caroline, S. B. DURHAM posted the bond and William BYRD performed the
ceremony. The combination of these names connects two locations (as posted
before) for a probable "acquaintance" between the family of William A. &
Fidelia Dover and John Dover and his remaining family.

The PHILLIPS in Union County, South Carolina also appear to have connections
in both Spartanburg and possibly York. There is an unconnected PHILLIPS in
this area that has a MULLINAX marriage, same line as FJD's wife. Thomas
CROSS, I think, was in Spartanburg before going to Pendleton. 
Byrd, Nancy (I198)
 
185 from http://www.pgthomassonfuneralservices.com/memsol.cgi?user_id=1271646:

Life Legacy

Joseph Howell Wallace

Virginia Beach - Joseph Howell Wallace was born on September 1, 1950 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He was the son of Myrtle Loretta and Joseph Jackson Wallace. Joe died on March 14, 2014, at age 63, from a sudden heart attack. He was preceded in death by his parents and his two older sisters, Charlotte Johnston and Joan Arnett. He leaves behind to cherish his memory his three remaining sisters, Patricia Sterling (Charles), Kathy Burnell, and Janet Shingledecker (Andrew), as well as his nephews, Christopher, Michael, and Vincent Shingledecker, Berry and Aaron Henderson, and his niece, Brenda Warwick.

Joe enjoyed his early childhood years in the rural home of his birth. After the family relocated to Norfolk, Virginia Joe attended school and graduated from Maury High School with honors. He also attended Virginia Tech University and later worked with his father in his engineering business.

Joe excelled at mechanics and also enjoyed various hobbies, such as photography, music, scuba diving, airbrush painting, and traveling.

Joey was a beloved son, loyal brother, generous uncle, and kind friend. His endearing qualities have left their mark on the hearts of all who knew him and will be sorely missed.

A memorial service will be held for him on Saturday, March 22, at 2 p.m., at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, 184A Pritchard Road, Virginia Beach, VA 23452. 
Wallace, Joseph Howell (I2933)
 
186 from Saturday, June 7, 1884 Cecil Whig
Transcribed and contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by Cyndie Enfinger

Mrs. L. M. Jones.
Another of Elkton's Aged Citizens Gone to Rest.
The hand of death has been busy in our midst of late, and almost continually a
grave has been open in the cemetery awaiting the coming of its occupant.
The last sad announcement of this character was made on Sunday last when the
decease of Mrs. L. Maria Jones, widow of the late William Jones and mother of W.
J. Jones, Esq., of the Elkton bar, was made public.
Her illness was brief-so much so, indeed; that only her most intimate friends
were appraised of it previous to her demise. She died last Sunday morning
between ten and eleven o'clock, at the residence of her son on North street, in
whose family she had made her home for a number of years.
Mrs. Jones was a sister of James McKinsey, of Philadelphia, formerly
postmaster of this town. She was a lady of modest and retiring disposition and
spent her whole time in the quiet of the family circle, being averse to the
crowd and battles of every day life, hence she was known thoroughly, and the
many beauties of her character appreciated only by intimate friends of the
family. She was a true Christian woman, and a consistent member of the M. E.
church. Throughout her illness, which though short was severe and painful, she
was sustained and supported by an unfaltering faith, submitting and resigning
herself entirely to the will of her Heavenly Father, passing away calmly and
quietly like one lying down to pleasant dreams, a fitting close of an even and
beautiful life.
Her funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon. Service was held at the house,
Rev. Mr. Sheppard, officiating, and the remains were interred in the Elkton
cemetery. 
McKinsey, Lydia Maria (I88)
 
187 From The Alpena News, Monday, December 20, 1926:
Mrs. LaComb was born in Cork, Ireland, 81 years ago, coming to New York at the age of fifteen, and later to Alpena, where she lived on a farm near Long Lake until the death of her husband 22 years ago.

---------------------------------

Her death certificate claims that she was in the U.S. for 73 years.

So, did she immigrate at about the age of 7 (according to death certificate, abt. 1853) or 15 (according to newspaper article, abt. 1860), or some time in between?

---------------------------------

Listed as Hannah in 1870 census and on son John LaComb's birth record in 1875. 
McCarthy, Norah (Honora) (I533)
 
188 From the Arkansas Intelligencer, May 1, 1847
"Requested and authorized to act as Agents for the "Intelligencer."
Wm. H. Doak, Clarksville, Texas

-------------------------------------------

This is from a letter written by Augustus Wattles to Thaddeus Hyatt (http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/2614/text) which references William H. Doak:

AUGUSTUS WATTLES TO THADDEUS HYATT

New York Dec.3, 1860
Dear Hyatt

I wish you to know that the Capt. Doake who is mentioned in the telegraph dispatches this morning from Missouri, as raising men to defend the state against Montgomery, is a brother in law of the notorious Gen. Clark who killed Barber, in 1855 near Lawrence Doake lived at Lecompton at that time, and left on the defeat of that party. He & Clark went into Texas, Arkansas and Southern Missouri & raised an army who came into Kansas in the summer of 1856 and drove every free State settler out of Bourbon & Lynn counties, and confiscated their property The cattle & horses were sold at public auction in Missouri and the money divided mostly amongst the officers.
The claims of the free State settlers were also confiscated and sold or otherwise occupied by men of the Slave party. This was particularly the case on the Little Osage river. In the winter & spring of 1857 the free State settlers returned to their homes & finding them occupied, proceeded to eject the occupants, and to reestablish themselves again. This led to a strife which has kept the country in a turmoil for the last three years. Mr. Doak has been several times into Kansas & committed unlawful acts. Last year he came with a company and arrested a man in Kansas by the name of Wright without any process of law & put him in a Missouri jail. I have always understood him to be a disunionist. I know Mr Bracket, the Hamiltons & others of his associates were.

The old cry of insurrection when they are defeated is familiar to all. How can Kansas be in insurrection against Mo.? It is simply The story is intended to raise an excitement to blind the country to the great outrage against the settler in selling their farms again at the present Land Sale.
Montgomery has no 1000 men nor 500 men nor any number of men from [?]. It is simply such a combinationation [sic] of settler to protect their property against speculators as has been common at every land sale in the free territories for there twenty or thirty years. This combination is formidable only to those who are intending wrong These settlers cannot pay for their claims and the President, as I understood, advised them to combine for their mutual protection. They have done so. But as this breaks up the plan of ridding southern Kansas of free State settlers it is called an insurrection and Capt. Montgomery & others are charged with crime, and Gen. Harvey is sent with the U. S. army to arrest them. All this is to cripple the free State by depriving the settlers of their home & thus removing one great obstacle to the making of a new Slave State out of Southern Kansas & the Cherokee Country.

The country is greatly imposed upon by the reports from Mo.
The poor settlers who have been burnt out by the government officials & those who are moving from Texas are now in that vicinity, & these added to the settlers who expect to be sold out, make a very formidable army against the oppressers - and these compose it.

The worst will happen before we reach them, so far as a collision is concerned
Mr Dennison and I have done pretty well today. We cannot have the Cooper Institute on Thursday night, so the plan is to put off the meeting till next week.
Most truly yours Augustus Wattles

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Conferderate Service Record :

Wm. H. Doak
Capt., Co. A, 3 Regt. MO Cav
Appears on a Roll of Captains, 8th Division, Missouri State Guard, 1861.

When elected May 4, 1861.
Where born, Mississippi
Age 32
Post Office Butler
County Bates
Remarks: Resigned Dec 13, 1861.

ALSO:
Wm H Doak
Capt, Capt. Wm. H. Doak's Company,
Clarkson's Batt'n Independent Rangers
Age 32 years

Roll Dated Tah le Quah, C.N.
Sept. 14, 1862

Joined for duty and enrolled:
When June 28, 186_
Where Grand Saline
By Whom Major Buster
Period 1 year

Roll dated Oct 31, 1862 Present
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
 
Doak, William H. (I1555)
 
189 From the Social Security Death Index:
Death Residence Localities
ZIP Code: 85901
Localities: Carrizo, Navajo, Arizona
Show Low, Navajo, Arizona
Shumway, Navajo, Arizona
 
Doak, Gladys Mae (I9)
 
190 from The War in Kansas: A Rough Trip to the Border, Among New Homes and a Strange People by George Douglas Brewerton:
"... we had the pleasure of a very brief acquaintance, during our visit at her [Malvina's] house, which, slight as it was, gave us a very high opinion of the good sense and true feminine courage of our fair hostess." 
Doak, Malvina Deluren (I1553)
 
191 from: Biographical and genealogical history of the state of Delaware, Volume 1 by Runk, J.M. & Co:

His [George W. Moore's] grandfather, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage, was a soldier in the colonial army during the Revolutionary War, and his grandmother was so harassed by the British soldiers that she removed from her home in Delaware to a safer place across the state line in Pennsylvania. There James Moore, father of George W. Moore, was born. After peace was declared, Mrs. Moore returned to Delaware with her young son, and rejoined her husband. James Moore was a millwright until his marriage, when he turned his attention to farming, in which he was engaged in New Castle county, Del., and Cecil county, Md., until within a few years before his death, when he removed to Newark, Del., and made his home with his son, George W. Mr. Moore enlisted in a volunteer company of infantry during the War of 1812, and was assigned to guard duty at New Castle, Del. He was a Republican, and afterward a Democrat, in his political views. James Moore married Martha Kennett, born in York County, Pa., a daughter of a soldier of the Revolution. They had children: I. Jane (Mrs. James R. Reynolds), died in Cecil county, Md.; II. Ann (Mrs. Washington Woodward), deceased; III. Eliza (Mrs. E. Lamborn), of Lancaster, Pa.; IV. John, deceased; V. Robert, deceased; VI. William M., deceased; VII. Sarah (Mrs. William W. Bowers), of Wilmington, widow; VIII. George W.; IX. James T., of Cumberland, Md. Mr. Moore died in Newark; his widow died in Cecil county, Md.; both were buried in Sharp's gravevard in Cecil county, Md.
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I wonder if the Moore family originally lived in Pennsylvania and during the war, Mrs. Moore (George W. Moore's grandmother) "removed from her home" in Pennsylvania "to a safer place across the state line in" Delaware. The DAR applications with James Moore (Sr.) as the patriot, has him serving in the Chester County militia.

His place of birth on both the 1850 and 1860 censuses is Delaware, NOT Pennsylvania.

----------------------------------------------------------

A hand-written note by my great-grandmother, Grace Maynard Tyson, says James Moore, her great-grandfather, was in the War of 1812. 
Moore, James (I444)
 
192 from: Biographical and genealogical history of the state of Delaware, Volume 1 by Runk, J.M. & Co:

His [George W. Moore's] grandfather, who was of Scotch-Irish parentage, was a soldier in the colonial army during the Revolutionary War, and his grandmother was so harassed by the British soldiers that she removed from her home in Delaware to a safer place across the state line in Pennsylvania. There James Moore, father of George W. Moore, was born. After peace was declared, Mrs. Moore returned to Delaware with her young son, and rejoined her husband. James Moore was a millwright until his marriage, when he turned his attention to farming, in which he was engaged in New Castle county, Del., and Cecil county, Md., until within a few years before his death, when he removed to Newark, Del., and made his home with his son, George W. Mr. Moore enlisted in a volunteer company of infantry during the War of 1812, and was assigned to guard duty at New Castle, Del. He was a Republican, and afterward a Democrat, in his political views. James Moore married Martha Kennett, born in York County, Pa., a daughter of a soldier of the Revolution. 
Robinson, Eliza (I1185)
 
193 From: Cecil County Maryland, Signers of the Oath of Allegiance Sworn by County Justices March 2nd, 1778 copied and published by Mollie Howard Ash

The Oath of Fidelity was instituted by Laws of Maryland 1777, Chapter 20, An Act for the Better Security of Government. Every free male 18 years and older was required to subscribe to an oath renouncing the King of England and to pledge allegiance to the revolutionary government of Maryland. Those already engaged in military service were assumed to be loyal. Quakers, Mennonites, and Dunkards were permitted to affirm.

There is a John McKinsey on page 20. Could he be a relative of Benjamin?

From Maryland State Archives: Cecil County, Maryland 1783 Supply Tax
State, General Assembly, Assessment Record, 1783, MSA S1161-36 to 41, Location 01/04/05/046 and 01/04/05/047:

2nd District - John McKinsey Baltimore Value of Other Property £1000

From Names of persons who took the oath of allegiance to the State of Pennsylvania, between the years 1777 and 1789, with a history of the "Test laws" of Pennsylvania (1865) :
October 11,1785
John McKinsey, from Scotland, resident here one year. 
McKinsey, Benjamin K. Sr. (I45)
 
194 Gabriel Drouin, comp. <i>Drouin Collection</i>. Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Institut Généalogique Drouin. Source (S806)
 
195 GARRETT, EDWARD
Ancestor #: A044175
Notice:
MORE ON BACK--SEE COMMENT (WHY?)
Service:
SOUTH CAROLINA Rank: PATRIOTIC SERVICE
Birth:
8-31-1733 PRINCE WILLIAM CO VIRGINIA
Death:
8-25-1794 LAURENS CO NINETY SIX DIST SOUTH CAROLINA
Service Source:
SALLEY & WATES, STUB ENTRIES TO INDENTS, BOOKS R-T, P 184, LIBER S #506
Service Description:
1) FURNISHED SUPPLIES FOR ARMY 
Garrett, Edward (I236)
 
196 General Anemia Moore, Ann (I1176)
 
197 General Register Office. <i>England and Wales Civil Registration Indexes</i>. London, England: General Register Office. © Crown copyright. Published by permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Office for National Statistics. You must not copy on, transfer or reproduce records without the prior permission of ONS. Database Copyright © 1998-2003 Graham Hart, Ben Laurie, Camilla von Massenbach and David Mayall. Source (S832)
 
198 General Register Office. <i>England and Wales Civil Registration Indexes</i>. London, England: General Register Office. © Crown copyright. Published by permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Office for National Statistics. You must not copy on, transfer or reproduce records without the prior permission of ONS. Database Copyright © 1998-2003 Graham Hart, Ben Laurie, Camilla von Massenbach and David Mayall. Source (S841)
 
199 General Register Office. <i>England and Wales Civil Registration Indexes</i>. London, England: General Register Office. © Crown copyright. Published by permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Office for National Statistics. You must not copy on, transfer or reproduce records without the prior permission of ONS. Indexes created by the General Register Office, in London, England. Source (S838)
 
200 George W. Clarke witnessed the signing of the TREATY WITH THE CREEKS AND SEMINOLE, 1845. Jan. 4, 1845

---------------------------------------------

The following is taken from the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program site talking about the
CLARKE-HARRELL-BURSON HOUSE in VAN BUREN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, Arkansas.

http://www.arkansaspreservation.com/historic-properties/_search_nomination_popup.aspx?id=1311

George Washington Clarke was born in the District of Columbia in 1812. At age twenty, he came to Arkansas and became an associate editor of the Van Buren, Arkansas Intelligencer in July 1843. The Arkansas Intelligencer was the first newspaper in Arkansas to be published west of Little Rock. It was established by Francis M. Van Horne and Thomas Sterne with the first copy being issued on January 22, 1842. In March of 1844 Clarke became the sole proprietor and editor of the paper. Previously, the Intelligencer had been politically neutral, but under Clarke's control the newspaper advocated the Democratic party's political philosophy. Thomas Sterne responded to this political change in his old paper by founding the Western Frontier Whig in May of 1844. A heated editorial war ensued between Clarke and Sterne's partner and chief editor, John S. Logan.

In addition to their political differences, the two rival editors' personalities were likewise at different poles. Clarke was described as being brilliant, impulsive, and forceful, whereas Logan was seen as calm, imperturbable, and self- possessed. The personality dissimilarity coupled with an intense political rivalry eventually culminated in an incident described by Judge Jesse Turner, which went beyond simple editorial bashing. Clarke initiated the conflict by referring to Logan as "Big Mush," the name of a certain comical Indian chief. Logan responded by labeling Clarke with the equally devastating insult of "Toady." The Rubicon had been crossed and honor could now only be satisfied with blood. A duel with rifles at sixty paces was decided upon. Two shots were exchanged on the "field of honor" near Fort Smith, but the smell of powder and bad marksmanship led to a rather sudden reconciliation.

The bitter editorial war was soon over as the Western Frontier Whig moved to Victoria, Texas sometime in 1845. Also, in April of 1845 Clarke left the Intelligencer for two years. He resumed ownership on March 21, 1847 and continued his editorial duties until 1853 when he received an appointment as Indian Agent for the Pottowatomie Indians in the Kansas Territory. Besides being an editor, Clarke was elected to the Arkansas State Senate in 1850. It was in the Senate that he first took an active interest in the affairs of the Indian Territories. Although the biography of the irrepressible Clarke extends until December 19, 1880, only the ten-year period from 1843 to 1853 is relevant for the purposes of this nomination. Despite the lack of conclusive records, one can assume that Clarke resided in his frame house in Logtown throughout his Intelligencer years up until his Indian Agent appointment.

see http://www.kancoll.org/books/gihon/g_chap11.htm regarding the killing of Thomas Barber by George W. Clarke

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from The War in Kansas.: A rough trip to the border, among new homes and a strange people by George Douglas Brewerton:
Doctor Johnson's letter, of which the Major very kindly permitted us to make a copy, reads as follows;
HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE, KANSAS TERRITORY, December 80, 1855.
DEAR MAJOR: Rufus, the bearer of this letter, will inform you that matters are fast coming to a desperate conclusion with us-a crisis which requires both prompt and energetic action is approaching. Your family are not safe here even for a single night. Your house is watched as though it were a den of thieves. Your dog has disappeared; we presume he has been decoyed away and killed to prevent his giving an alarm. One of your carriage horses has been poisoned, and, in addition to this, an attempt was made to fire your house. This occurred last night, between twelve and one o'clock A.M. It was fortunate that we discovered the fire before it was too late; we were but just in time to save the building. Had it been otherwise, God only knows what would have become of your family; for, even supposing that they had escaped the flames, they would have been exposed to the danger of perishing in the bitter cold of this inclement season, ere they could have reached the nearest neighbor's house. (Major Clarke's residence is three-quarters of a mile from any house, and the mercury at the time stood at twenty degrees below zero, and it would have been almost a miracle, under such circumstances, if they had escaped freezing.) But to come to the point: you cannot live here; it is risking too much; the very existence of your family is at stake; your own life is in imminent danger; you would not be safe here-no, not for a single day. If you were here it would only aggravate the evil. For God's sake, remove your family. Take them to Missouri, or up among the Pottawatomie Indians. They would be safe there. Your property, too, is in imminent danger. Every day brings the intelligence of some new act of outrage-houseburnings, brutal threatenings, and attempted assassinations. How can we go on living thus, in God's name? Is there no law in Kansas? To whom are we to look for aid? How is all this to end? Are our lives to be menaced -is our property to be destroyed-and are women and children to be driven from their desolated homes, without the upraising of an arm to stay the perpetrators of these acts of lawless violence? Is there no power vested in our Governor-no protection to be obtained from the Executive? Or must the law-abiding citizens of Kansas be driven into the terrible alternative of defending, by Lynch law and armed violence, their homes and firesides? If we have laws why are they not enforced? Something must be done for our relief, and that speedily.

The foregoing is all which would be interesting to the reader. It is written by Dr. George W. Johnson, who is- as we have elsewhere stated-a son of Governor Johnson of Virginia. A postscript from William H. Doak, Esq., a brother-in-law of Major Clarke's-the bearer of the documents being named Rufus-endorses and corroborates the foregoing statements, and adds that they are going to get some of their neighbors to assist in defending Major Clarke's house until arrangements can be made for the removal of his family. The letter from Mrs. Clarke is of similar import. Major Clarke's residence is at present occupied by two families-this has been the case since the breaking out of the Kansas troubles. Among its inmates may be numbered two females and five small children. Had they been left houseless, on the bitter night of December thirtieth, to find their way through the frozen snow to the nearest dwelling (three-quarters of a mile distant), it is most probable that some of these little ones would have fallen victims to the terrible state of things which now exists in some sections of Kansas.

---------------------------------------------------

from Kansas Historical Society; http://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/cool-things-proslavery-leader-s-desk/10309

George W. Clarke was a notorious proslavery leader during the Bleeding Kansas era, when forces sought control over the state based on the issue of slavery. Clarke had been suspected of killing a free-state man, Thomas Barber, near Lawrence in 1855 but was never convicted. The following year, Clarke led a party of 400 Missourians into Linn County on the eastern edge of the state, where, in the words of a fellow proslavery man, they "plundered, robbed and burned out of house and home nearly every Free-state family in Linn County, while [Clarke's] hands were steeped in innocent blood, and the light of burning buildings marked his course."
A Shot in the Dark
While Clarke sat reading by the desk at his home near Lecompton in 1856, someone--presumably a free-stater--shot at him. Clarke was uninjured but the desk did not fare as well. The bullet passed through the front of the desk and left a divot in the surface of the drawer directly behind it. The hole left by the bullet can be seen in the image of the closed desk as the dark spot below the keyhole and near left-center.
Clarke began working in the U. S. Land office in Fort Scott in 1857. Many years later, Judge William Margrave gave the following account of Clarke during this period:
"[He] was practically registrar of the land office but there was a story afloat, and I guess it was true, that he had killed somebody up near Lecompton and the government wouldn't appoint him directly but appointed somebody else [Wm. H. Doak, Clarke's brother-in-law] and Clarke performed the duties. . . . [Clarke] was a border ruffian of the worst kind. If he wasn't killed before he got away from Kansas it was a mistake on the part of the people who knew him."
Clarke continued his proslavery activities in Fort Scott and nearby Missouri until he was finally driven out of the state and into southwestern Missouri in August, 1858.

------------------------------------------------------

Mexico City National Cemetery Interments - Dated 20 April 1984
Records obtained from Paul Badgley, Superintendent of the Mexico City National Cemetery
Format: Marker#, Name, Location, Age/Birth, Death, Remarks
277, CLARK, George W, Loc: W 4 4 5, 22 Feb 1812, 19 Dec 1880, Major Heart Disease, Founder of newspaper Dos Republicas, US

---------------------------------------------------

Death Notices From THE MONTGOMERY DAILY ADVERTISER
Transcribed by Larry E. Caver, Jr.

January 8, 1881:

Major George W. CLARKE, editor and proprietor of the Two Republics, an
American newspaper published in the city of Mexico, died December 19th, in Mexico.
For many years he owned and edited the Intelligencer, at Van Buren, Crawford
County, Arkansas. He joined the Confederate Army at the beginning of the war,
and at its close emigrated to Mexico… 
Clarke, George W (I1557)
 

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